How to bring unmanaged anxiety under control

by | Oct 10, 2018

Dealing with unmanaged anxiety

As people find their lives and workplaces increasingly stressful, it is essential that we learn how to control unmanaged anxiety. 

There has been a significant rise in mental health issues at the workplace, especially stress and anxiety. It’s important that we learn how to manage these conditions, in particular to learn how to bring unmanaged anxiety under control. In extreme circumstances, unmanaged anxiety can come between us and reaching our goals.

Anxiety is defined as:

A feeling of worry, nervousness, or unease about something with an uncertain outcome.

In today’s organisations there is a great deal of uncertainty. Being able to navigate ambiguity is now becoming a sought after, key skill. But if you are a person who struggles with this, how do you learn to manage anxiety so it doesn’t interfere with your career and block your success? The key is learning some tips so you can tap into it as a source of energy. Don't see it as a barrier, but as a potential career booster. This can help make you to not only be a better employee, but also a more satisfied and content individual.

Unmanaged anxiety and the body

Here is an infographic, courtesy of HealthLine, that showcases the impact that unmanaged anxiety can have on the body.

Unmanaged anxiety in the workplace can lead to lack of confidence, imposter syndrome, under-performance, lack of engagement and ultimately absenteeism for health reasons. On the physical side, when the stress response kicks in all the time, it can put your health at more serious risk. It’s important to create some strategies to help identify triggers and bring the worst under control.

Unmanaged anxiety

Daily tips to deal with unmanaged anxiety

Identify the cause

Anxiety is very often rooted in a deep-seated inner source, although some people experience external triggers around specific issues. Public speaking is listed as one of the greatest workplace stressors. Coaching will help you with this. Dallia Ramirez, a Public Affairs Consultant told 3Plus:

A significant part of anxiety is not knowing what is going to happen or anticipating a negative result. It’s a little bit like exaggerated Imposter Syndrome. I’ve learned over time to anticipate as many potential outcomes as possible and put contingency plans or scenarios in place. This helps me manage my anxiety. But you have to take care that you don’t stray into over control. There are things that happen and you have to learn to deal with the unexpected. It’s life and work. You have to give yourself permission to accept the unknown. I have worked with a coach and a therapist on this.

If you feel that your anxiety is rooted in something in your past, a negative experience, or even a trauma, it’s important to see a therapist who can help you come to terms with it. Anxiety Disorder is a recognised mental health condition which can strongly interfere with daily life. To be diagnosed, symptoms typically need to be present for at least 6 months and have led to decrease functioning. It's important that you seek professional help immediately.

Anxiety can often come from a lack of confidence. But fear not, confidence is something you can improve with our Returner Roll-Up Session on Building your Confidence.

unmanaged anxiety

Find allies

Unmanaged anxiety, whether socially or in the workplace, interferes with building meaningful relationships with co-workers and is even a barrier to effective communication. Try and find some trusted allies who understand what you are going through and talk it out with them. Many women experience crises of confidence and knowing you are not alone can be a source of comfort or even a boost.

Seek personal space

Sometimes, especially in busy environments, the buzz of the workplace can be overwhelming for people prone to anxiety. Most offices now have a quiet work room where people can seek some peace. Companies allow employees to work with ear buds to block out any ambient noise so you can concentrate better.

Jennifer Lewis, a Retail Manager suggests “Use coffee and lunch breaks to go for a walk or sit in park, if that’s possible. This helps me find some equilibrium. My colleagues recognise when I need Jen Time!”

Learn to manage it

Stress on its own is not necessarily a bad thing. It is simply our body’s way of dealing with what we perceive as a threat in a primal freeze, fight or flight way. Unmanaged anxiety is only a problem when it interferes with our well-being and career success.

How we forge relationships in the workplace can be a source of great anxiety. Contact 3Plus to develop your communication and networking skills.

Staff Writer: Career Contributor
3Plus welcomes any writers to join 3Plus as a Staff Writer. If you are an expert in Job Search, Career and Mentoring or just want to share your experiences, contact us! We would love to give you a voice!

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